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Smashwords’ Summer/Winter Sale 2020

Book Covers Michelle Louring

Book Covers Michelle Louring

It’s time for another Smashwords’ Summer/Winter sale!

For the entire month of July, the ebook store Smashwords will have thousands of discounted and free ebooks.

I hope all of you in the Northern Hemisphere are enjoying the weather and getting a lot of reading done, and not – like me – up to your ears in thistles while trying to weed the garden. Summer does have its disadvantages.

But it’s all worth it when you get to sit outside in the evening sun with a good book and a cold drink! My library is well-stocked for once, but that won’t stop me from checking out every book sale I come across. You never know when you might need those 57 new books…

Of course I’m an author as well as a reader, so as always, my own books are to be found among the discounted titles on Smashwords. I’m not telling you to go download them, but…

You should go download them.

All kidding aside, I’m truly hoping to find some great deals this year. As you probably know, I’m fond of Fantasy and Horror, but I might give some other genres a try if I see something interesting.

Readers, feel free to post your favorite Summer/Winter Sale finds in the comments!

Smashwords’ Summer/Winter Sale

1. July – 31. July 2020

Resounding Echo Michelle Louring cover
Resounding Echo – FREE
Silent Sound Michelle Louring cover
Silent Sound – 75% OFF
Quiet Whisper Michelle Louring cover
Quiet Whisper – 75% OFF
Ghostly Scream Michelle Louring cover
Ghostly Scream – 75% OFF
Redesign Fantasy Cover
Huntress – FREE
Book Cover Demon
Demon’s Dance – FREE
Song of Angels Book Cover
Song of Angels – 75% OFF
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The Bookish Owl – Moving Pictures by Terry Pratchett

Moving Pictures by Terry Pratchett

Lights! Camera! Action! It’s Moving Pictures by Terry Pratchett.

This has always been my least favorite Discworld book, but I did like it a little better upon rereading it. I do, however, think it could have been vastly improved by more scenes with the wizards. Especially since this is the book that introduces Archchancellor Ridcully, my favorite wizard and nightmare boss. But then again, there’s only so many times the poor Bursar can be nearly shot by his new boss before he loses it, and he did deserve to keep his sanity, at least until the end of the book…

But the mental image of most of Unseen University’s faculty clinging to to Windle Poon’s racing wheelchair while screaming their heads off was amazing, and I could have used more of that. Compared to that, Victor just wasn’t that interesting a main character.


Moving Pictures
by Terry Pratchett

‘Holy wood is a different sort of place. People act differently here. Everywhere else the most important things are gods or money or cattle. Here, the most important thing is to be important.’

People might say that reality is a quality that things possess in the same way that they possess weight. Sadly alchemists never really held with such a quaint notion. They think that they can change reality, shape it to their own purpose. Imagine then the damage that could be wrought if they get their hands on the ultimate alchemy: the invention of motion pictures, the greatest making of illusions. It may be a triumph of universe-shaking proportions. It’s either that or they’re about to unlock the dark terrible secret of the Holy Wood hills – by mistake…


Moving Pictures by Terry Pratchett

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Broken Melody – Excerpt (Chapter 11)

Excerpt Book

A few rays of morning light fell on her face and Selissa reluctantly returned to the land of the conscious, just to immediately regret this development once she became aware of the violent pounding in her head.

Some distant part of her mind noted that she usually slept in a windowless room. She reluctantly opened an eye, fearing what she might see.

The goat staring at her wasn’t the weirdest thing she had ever woken up to, and judging from the look on the goat’s face, an unconscious mercenary wouldn’t have attracted much interest if she hadn’t been laying in its feeding trough.

“I’m never drinking again,” Selissa groaned as she pushed the goat away and gracelessly dragged herself out of her makeshift bed. She wasn’t exactly sure how she had ended up in the stable, but at least it beat passing out in the snow and waking up after losing a couple of toes to frostbite.

The goat was still staring at her, its strange slitted eyes unblinking.

“Don’t judge me,” she told it sullenly.

Her head was killing her and her memories of the previous night were fuzzy at best, but she was pretty sure she hadn’t achieved much in the way of information gathering. Unless you counted the fact that some of the mousy little mage researchers were far better at handling their booze than she would have given them credit for . . .

The last thing she remembered was challenging the Professor of Archaic Artifacts to a drinking match, and while she would already have been pretty inebriated before suggesting such a thing, she had clearly underestimated the spindly, bespectacled mage.

‘You also tried to pick a fight with a hat stand later,’ Cadeyrn informed her helpfully.

“Shut. Up,” Selissa said. The hangover was bad enough; she didn’t need the voices in her head right now.

Fighting the urge to stay on the nice cold floor, Selissa decided she better get moving before the owner of the stable showed up to chase her out with a pitchfork.

It wouldn’t have been the first time.

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The Bookish Owl – The City of Brass by S. A. Chakraborty

City of Brass by S. A. Chakraborty

This time it’s The City of Brass by S. A. Chakraborty.

First off, I want to say that this book has great characters, amazing worldbuilding and the plot is also just fine.

Which is why I have absolutely no idea why it took me 300 pages to get into it. It just didn’t do it for me for a long time, but as soon as I hit that 300 page mark it suddenly became insanely exciting and before I knew it, I had devoured the rest of the book and ordered the sequel.

‘The City of Brass’ is filled with djinn, ifrits and other creatures from Arabic folklore, and all the political drama you could wish for. None of the subplots were resolved in this book, so I have great hopes that the next book in the trilogy sheds some light on a few of the mysteries. And of course there was also a total cliffhanger at the end, so I really have no choice but to read on, do I?


The City of Brass
by S. A. Chakraborty

Nahri has never believed in magic. Certainly, she has power; on the streets of 18th century Cairo, she’s a con woman of unsurpassed talent. But she knows better than anyone that the trade she uses to get by—palm readings, zars, healings—are all tricks, sleights of hand, learned skills; a means to the delightful end of swindling Ottoman nobles.

But when Nahri accidentally summons an equally sly, darkly mysterious djinn warrior to her side during one of her cons, she’s forced to accept that the magical world she thought only existed in childhood stories is real. For the warrior tells her a new tale: across hot, windswept sands teeming with creatures of fire, and rivers where the mythical marid sleep; past ruins of once-magnificent human metropolises, and mountains where the circling hawks are not what they seem, lies Daevabad, the legendary city of brass, a city to which Nahri is irrevocably bound.

In that city, behind gilded brass walls laced with enchantments, behind the six gates of the six djinn tribes, old resentments are simmering. And when Nahri decides to enter this world, she learns that true power is fierce and brutal. That magic cannot shield her from the dangerous web of court politics. That even the cleverest of schemes can have deadly consequences.

After all, there is a reason they say be careful what you wish for… 


City of Brass by S. A. Chakraborty

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The Bookish Owl – Arthas by Christie Golden

Arthas by Christie Golden

It’s Warcraft time, with Arthas by Christie Golden!

I read this when it was first released, many years ago, but it was nice to revisit the story of Prince Arthas Menethil, and his transition into the Lich King, the leader of an undead army set on erasing all life on Azeroth. It’s one of the main storylines in both Warcraft 3 and World of Warcraft, and I have played the franchise since I was 10 years old, so I might be a little obsessed with its lore.

Plus: Zombies.


Arthas: Rise of the Lich King
by Christie Golden

His evil is legend. Lord of the undead Scourge, wielder of the runeblade Frostmourne, and enemy of the free peoples of Azeroth. The Lich King is an entity of incalculable power and unparalleled malice — his icy soul utterly consumed by his plans to destroy all life on the World of Warcraft.

But it was not always so. Long before his soul was fused with that of the orc shaman Ner’zhul, the Lich King was Arthas Menethil, crown prince of Lordaeron and faithful paladin of the Silver Hand.

When a plague of undeath threatened all that he loved, Arthas was driven to pursue an ill-fated quest for a runeblade powerful enough to save his homeland. Yet the object of his search would exact a heavy price from its new master, beginning a horrifying descent into damnation. Arthas’s path would lead him through the arctic northern wastes toward the Frozen Throne, where he would face, at long last, the darkest of destinies.


Arthas by Christie Golden