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The Bookish Owl – Wyrd Sisters by Terry Pratchett

Wyrd Sisters Terry Pratchett

New book, and it’s Wyrd Sisters by Terry Pratchett.

I ran out of City Watch books, so my Discworld reread is moving to the Witches subseries now. I remember not liking this book as much as the other Discworld books when I first read it, but I think it might be because I didn’t yet have the deep appreciation of Granny Weatherwax and Nanny Ogg that I developed later. Not sure why it took me so long to get into the Witches books, but it wasn’t until about “Maskerade” that I really started liking them as much as the rest of the series.

I think it might be because, in the beginning, they weren’t as funny as the others, though they had better plots. Or, maybe, it was just because Esme Weatherwax and I can be a bit too similar for comfort…

Either way, I’m hoping to enjoy my reread of the earlier books more!

(Also, don’t worry about Artemis being creepy – I told him it was October, so he’s just getting into the Halloween spirit)


Wyrd Sisters
by Terry Pratchett

Three witches – Granny Weatherwax, Nanny Ogg and Magrat Garlick – have gathered on a lonely heath. A king has been cruelly murdered, his throne usurped by his ambitious cousin. An infant heir and the crown of the kingdom, both missing . . .

Witches don’t have these kind of dynastic problems themselves – in fact, they don’t have leaders.

Granny Weatherwax was the most highly-regarded of the leaders the witches don’t have. But even she found that meddling in royal politics was a lot more complicated than certain playwrights would have you believe . . .


Wyrd Sisters Terry Pratchett

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The Bookish Owl – Jingo by Terry Pratchett

Jingo Terry Pratchett

Here’s Jingo by Terry Pratchett.

Yep, I’m rereading all the Discworld City Watch books I haven’t already read in 2019. After that, I’ll probably move on to rereading the Witch books. And then probably the rest of the Death books…

Don’t ever think running out of books is going to stop me from reading Discworld.

Jingo introduces geopolitics to the Discworld. And obviously Ankh-Morpork is going to mess that up (that’s just what Ankh-Morpork does, okay?), and suddenly we have Vimes embracing his knighthood, Nobby in drag, and Lord Vetinari becoming a street performer.

Also, there’s a lot of talk of camels…


Jingo
by Terry Pratchett

Discworld goes to war!

Somewhere in the Circle Sea between Ankh-Morpork and Al-Khali, the Lost Kingdom of Leshp has emerged after hundreds of years beneath the waves. And so with no ships, no army and no money, Ankh-Morpork goes to war against the Klatchian army claiming the rock as their own.

Undaunted by the prospect of being tortured to death by vastly superior numbers of enemy troops, a small band of intrepid men and a very thick troll set out under the command of Sir Samuel Vimes of the City Watch.

If they can survive long enough, maybe they can arrest an entire army for breach of the peace…


Jingo Terry Pratchett

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The Bookish Owl – Feet of Clay by Terry Pratchett

Feet of Clay Terry Pratchett

Here’s Feet of Clay by Terry Pratchett.

I’m actually already done with this, because I started it just before going on a trip to Budapest, and as I had already dropped off Artemis at his new owl-sitters (who have now been cured of any desire to get an owl of their own), I did not actually have an owl available for a photo.

So while Artemis was busy traumatizing my friends’ cats, I was rereading another of my favorite Discworld books. I think this might be my second-favorite City Watch book. Not sure what I love most: Vimes setting traps for assassins for sport, Vetinari being absolutely delirious from arsenic poisoning, or Nobby being frantically convinced that his boss will cut his head off if he, Nobby, is made king (“Mr Vimes’d go spare!”).


Feet of Clay
by Terry Pratchett

For members of the City Watch, life consists of troubling times, linked together by periods of torpid inactivity. Now is one such troubling time. People are being murdered, but there’s no trace of anything alive having been at the crime scene. Is there ever a circumstance in which you can blame the weapon not the murderer? Such philosophical questions are not the usual domain of the city’s police, but they’re going to have to start learning fast…


Feet of Clay Terry Pratchett

 

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The Bookish Owl – Men at Arms by Terry Pratchett

Men at Arms Terry Pratchett

Today’s owl photo features Men at Arms by Terry Pratchett!

And yes, I’m still alive (hurray!), but both my reading and my blog maintenance is suffering from being extremely busy. When I haven’t been working on making my writing deadline later this week, I have been fending off drunk guys at renaissance fairs and blowing stuff up in Dungeons & Dragons.

I wish I could say real life has been keeping me busy, but as you can tell, I have been going all-in with the make-believe.

Back to the book:
This is yet another Discworld reread. Men at Arms is the second book in the City Watch storyline, and while it’s not as great as ‘Guards! Guards!’, it’s still pretty damn great. I love the mismatched duo of Cuddy and Detritus, and Vimes, Colon, Nobby and Carrot are their usual wonderfully dysfunctional selves.

Angua is great as well, but the poor girl is really a bit too sane for her new friends.


Men at Arms
by Terry Pratchett

The City Watch needs MEN! But what it’s got includes Corporal Carrot (technically a dwarf), Lance-constable Cuddy (really a dwarf), Lance-constable Detritus (a troll), Lance-constable Angua (a woman… most of the time) and Corporal Nobbs (disqualified from the human race for shoving).

And they need all the help they can get, because someone in Ankh-Morpork has been getting dangerous ideas – about crowns and legendary swords, and destiny. And the problem with destiny is, of course, that she is not always careful where she points her finger. One minute you might be minding your own business on a normal if not spectacular career path, the next you might be in the frame for the big job, like saving the world…


Men at Arms Terry Pratchett

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The Bookish Owl – Mort by Terry Pratchett

Mort Terry Pratchett Collector's Edition

You know the deal, books and owls and all that. This time it’s Mort by Terry Pratchett.

This is another Discworld favorite that I’ve been looking forward to rereading. Death takes on a human apprentice. Said apprentice immediately messes everything up. Craziness ensues.

Only an author such as Pratchett can make Death into such a precious character and I absolutely adore him in ‘Mort’. He’s so cute when he’s trying to be a good master to his new apprentice, despite not understanding humans at all.

Poor Mort won’t know what hit him.


Mort
by Terry Pratchett

Death comes to us all. When he came to Mort, he offered him a job. Henceforth, Death is no longer going to be the end, merely the means to an end. It’s an offer Mort can’t refuse. As Death’s apprentice he’ll have free board, use of the company horse – and being dead isn’t compulsory. It’s a dream job – until he discovers that it can be a killer on his love life…


Mort Terry Pratchett Collector's Edition