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Top Ten Tuesday: Authors I’ve Read the Most Books By

Bookshelf

Top Ten Tuesday

I’m trying something new this week and doing one of the Top Ten Tuesday prompts, hosted by The Artsy Reader Girl. This week’s prompt is Authors I’ve Read the Most Books By, which seemed pretty manageable for my blog prompt debut.

I have now scoured my bookshelves to figure out who would get the 2nd through 10th spots on the list, because number 1 would be pretty obvious to anyone who’s followed this blog for any amount of time, or made the mistake of starting a conversation about fantasy books with me…


Bookshelf

Terry Pratchett

47 booksGuards Guards Terry Pratchett


Obviously Terry Pratchett takes first place. In fact, he not only takes first place, he leaves every other author in his dust. Not only have I read 47 of his books… half of them I have read twice. A few I have even read three times, and one I might have read four times.

…And I just ordered three more of his books.

George R. R. Martin

8 booksA Game of Thrones George R. R. Martin


I am not entirely sure if this one counts, since two of the books in question are so huge that they are each split in two volumes in the box set I own, but I feel like it does. The entirety of A Song of Ice and Fire + one prequel adds up to a LOT of words.

Andrzej Sapkowski

8 booksSeason of Storms Witcher


Andrzej Sapkowski ties with GRRM for second place, and like GRRM, all the books I have read by this author is in the same series. In this case, it’s The Witcher.

J. K. Rowling

7 booksHarry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone Cover


Surprise, surprise – I have read all 7 of the Harry Potter books. Honestly, they should count for more, considering I have read them in different languages (all 7 books in both Danish and English, and The Philosopher’s Stone in German as well), but that’s where we’re getting into technicalities.

Richard A. Knaak

6 books


I have read 6 of Richard A. Knaak’s World of Warcraft companion novels.

Christie Golden

5 books


Like with Knaak, I know Christie Golden from her World of Warcraft novels. I have read 5 of them, but I think I have 3 or 4 more stuffed away somewhere.

Leigh Bardugo

5 books


I have read 5 of Leigh Bardugo’s Grishaverse books, and two more are waiting on my shelf.

Tamora Pierce

5 books


Another 5-booker, where I intend to read more.

Genevieve Cogman

5 books


I have read 5 of the books in Genevieve Cogman’s The Invisible Library series.

Neil Gaiman

4 books


3 Neil Gaiman books take up the incredibly small space left over on the two shelves my Terry Pratchett collection occupies. They sit next to Good Omens, which was co-authored by the two of them.


Yeah, so… Very convincing victory to Sir Terry Pratchett!

I’m sure the list would have looked quite different if I could remember all the mystery novels I read as a teenager, but these are the authors I have read the most books from WITHOUT raiding my mother’s bookshelves.

What about you guys? Do we share any favorite authors, or do you have your own Pratchett who takes up half your available bookshelf space?

 

 

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The Bookish Owl – Moving Pictures by Terry Pratchett

Moving Pictures by Terry Pratchett

Lights! Camera! Action! It’s Moving Pictures by Terry Pratchett.

This has always been my least favorite Discworld book, but I did like it a little better upon rereading it. I do, however, think it could have been vastly improved by more scenes with the wizards. Especially since this is the book that introduces Archchancellor Ridcully, my favorite wizard and nightmare boss. But then again, there’s only so many times the poor Bursar can be nearly shot by his new boss before he loses it, and he did deserve to keep his sanity, at least until the end of the book…

But the mental image of most of Unseen University’s faculty clinging to to Windle Poon’s racing wheelchair while screaming their heads off was amazing, and I could have used more of that. Compared to that, Victor just wasn’t that interesting a main character.


Moving Pictures
by Terry Pratchett

‘Holy wood is a different sort of place. People act differently here. Everywhere else the most important things are gods or money or cattle. Here, the most important thing is to be important.’

People might say that reality is a quality that things possess in the same way that they possess weight. Sadly alchemists never really held with such a quaint notion. They think that they can change reality, shape it to their own purpose. Imagine then the damage that could be wrought if they get their hands on the ultimate alchemy: the invention of motion pictures, the greatest making of illusions. It may be a triumph of universe-shaking proportions. It’s either that or they’re about to unlock the dark terrible secret of the Holy Wood hills – by mistake…


Moving Pictures by Terry Pratchett

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The Bookish Owl – Pyramids by Terry Pratchett

Pyramids by Terry Pratchett

It’s time for assassins and disgruntled mummies with Pyramids by Terry Pratchett.

You didn’t think I was done with Discworld, did you?

I only have a few books left to finish my reread of this entire series, but I’m pacing myself. Running out of Pratchett books is one of the biggest problems I face in my reading life, so I’m rereading even those books that weren’t among my favorites the first time around. Pyramids doesn’t have the greatest story or characters, but it does have some pretty funny scenes. There’s Teppic getting ready for his Assassin’s exam and then promptly falling over from the weight of all the weapons he’s hidden on his person. And then there’s his prophetic dreams:

“There was seven fat cows and seven thin cows. One of them was playing the trombone.”

What the book needed was more Assassins. But considering I own two pairs of Assassin’s Guild socks, I might be bias…


Pyramids
by Terry Pratchett

It’s bad enough being new on the job, but Teppic hasn’t a clue as to what a pharaoh is supposed to do. After all, he’s been trained at Ankh-Morpork’s famed assassins’ school, across the sea from the Kingdom of the Sun. First, there’s the monumental task of building a suitable resting place for Dad — a pyramid to end all pyramids. Then there are the myriad administrative duties, such as dealing with mad priests, sacred crocodiles, and marching mummies. And to top it all off, the adolescent pharaoh discovers deceit, betrayal – not to mention a headstrong handmaiden – at the heart of his realm. 


Pyramids by Terry Pratchett

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The Bookish Owl – Interesting Times by Terry Pratchett

Interesting Times by Terry Pratchett

We live in interesting times, so I believe the timing is right for Interesting Times by Terry Pratchett.

This is the first Bookish Owl photo taken after Artemis’s operation, but I think he’s shy, because he won’t be showing off his new flamingo stance until the next one. But I can inform you that being one-legged absolutely didn’t stop him from knocking books over and making a run for it while we were taking pictures.

This is yet another Discworld reread, but it will be the last for a while… mostly because I’m running out of books to reread and might soon have to start on a round of re-rereading.

The very best thing about ‘Interesting Times’ is not Rincewind and his shenanigans, but Cohen the Barbarian and his ‘Silver Horde’. Reading about a group of old men wreaking havoc and creating terror wherever they go, all the while complaining about joint pains, gives me hope for my own retirement.

Can you guys recommend me any other fantasy books with badass old people? I feel like that’s what I need more of in my life right now.


Interesting Times
by Terry Pratchett

‘A foot on the neck is nine points of the law’

There are many who say that the art of diplomacy is an intricate and complex dance. There are others who maintain that it’s merely a matter of who carries the biggest stick. The oldest and most inscrutable (not to mention heavily fortified) empire on the Discworld is in turmoil, brought about by the revolutionary treatise What I did on My Holidays. Workers are uniting, with nothing to lose but their water buffaloes; warlords are struggling for power – and what the nation wants, to avoid terrible doom for everyone, is a wizard. Rincewind is not the Disc’s premier wizard – in fact, he can’t even spell ‘wizard’ – but no-one specified whether competence was an issue. And they do have a very big stick…

Mighty Battles! Revolution! Death! War! (And his sons Terror and Panic and daughter Clancy).


Interesting Times by Terry Pratchett

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The Bookish Owl – Soul Music by Terry Pratchett

Soul Music by Terry Pratchett

Let’s rock and roll with Soul Music by Terry Pratchett!

This isn’t my favorite Discworld novel, but the reread was all worth it just for the scenes with Susan and Ridcully. I find the whole rock music plot a little tame, but there’s still some first class jokes along the way, so I’ll still recommend reading this book.

Either way, please enjoy Artemis’s “Are we done now…?”-face in the photo below. We did 4 book photos in a row that day and by the end he couldn’t even be bothered to glare at the camera or try to eat the book.


Soul Music
by Terry Pratchett

Other children get given xylophones. Susan just had to ask her grandfather to take his vest off.
Yes. There’s a Death in the family.

It’s hard to grow up normally when Grandfather rides a white horse and wields a scythe – especially when you have to take over the family business, and everyone mistakes you for the Tooth Fairy.

And especially when you have to face the new and addictive music that has entered Discworld.

It’s lawless. It changes people.

It’s called Music With Rocks In.

It’s got a beat and you can dance to it, but…

It’s alive.

And it won’t fade away.


Soul Music by Terry Pratchett