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The Bookish Owl – The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman

The Graveyard Book Neil Gaiman

New book, and it’s The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman.

I have been told I should read this book, so… now I’m reading it.

You realize you have been reading too many series when you don’t know what to say as soon as you’re about to read a book where you don’t know what to expect.

I’m just going to talk about the owl photo, okay…?

I’m rather proud, since I finally succeeded in taking a decent photo of a book with a gold embossed cover (why do I own this many books with gold embossing, anyway?). And Artemis is at the top of his game, looking incredibly fierce for someone who’s the size of an underfed guinea pig.


The Graveyard Book
by Neil Gaiman

IT TAKES A GRAVEYARD TO RAISE A CHILD.

Nobody Owens, known as Bod, is a normal boy. He would be completely normal if he didn’t live in a graveyard, being raised by ghosts, with a guardian who belongs to neither the world of the living nor the dead. There are adventures in the graveyard for a boy—an ancient Indigo Man, a gateway to the abandoned city of ghouls, the strange and terrible Sleer. But if Bod leaves the graveyard, he will be in danger from the man Jack—who has already killed Bod’s family.


The Graveyard Book Neil Gaiman

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The Bookish Owl – Norse Mythology by Neil Gaiman

Norse Mythology Neil Gaiman

Next up is Norse Mythology by Neil Gaiman.

It’s exactly what it says on the tin: A book filled with the stories of the Norse gods. Seeing as I’m Scandinavian, these are stories I was told in school, but it’s nice revisiting them. I’ll never really get how Harald Bluetooth (famous Danish viking king, shut up) convinced everyone to convert to Christianity, because turning water into wine is really not as entertaining a story as a big, red-bearded thunder god dressing up as a blushing bride because he lost his hammer.

You just can’t beat that.


Norse Mythology
by Neil Gaiman

The great Norse myths, which have inspired so much of modern fiction, are dazzlingly retold by Neil Gaiman. Tales of dwarfs and frost giants, of treasure and magic, and of Asgard, home to the gods: Odin the all-father, highest and oldest of the Aesir; his mighty son Thor, whose hammer Mjollnir makes the mountain giants tremble; Loki, wily and handsome, reliably unreliable in his lusts; and Freya, more beautiful than the sun or the moon, who spurns those who seek to control her. 

From the dawn of the world to the twilight of the gods, this is a thrilling, vivid retelling of the Norse myths from the award-winning, bestselling Neil Gaiman.


Norse Mythology Neil Gaiman

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The Bookish Owl – Coraline by Neil Gaiman

Coraline Neil Gaiman Owl

I just started reading Coraline by Neil Gaiman. It’s technically a children’s book, but I’ve heard so many people talking about it, so I gave it a shot anyway.

Besides, after reading the first 5 chapters, I think I can safely say that those button-eyed people would have scared the crap out of me as a child.

It’s like a horror-version of Alice in Wonderland. All the same weirdness (and the feeling that the child protagonist is probably on drugs), but it’s all creepy instead of whimsical. It even got a cat that talks but refuses to give clear answers!

After reading Good Omens during my Pratchett bender, and having followed Gaiman on Twitter for years, I have wanted to read some of his non-cowritten work for some time. If you’re a Gaiman fan yourself, what do you think I should read next of his?

Coraline Neil Gaiman Owl